Sydney's infrastructure not keeping up and see our world rating on infrastructure quality

THE AGE  HAS THIS REPORT ON  INFRASTRUCTURE ACROSS THE STATES   BUT ESPECIALLY NOTE THE
LAST PARA  - THAT  IN THE 2010-11   WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM REPORT ON INFRASTRUCTURE  QUALITY WE ARE DOWN TO NUMBER 34 IN THE WORLD.
We know our infrastructure is way behind  and as the population grows and they don’t have the money to fix it up, we will get further behind.
 
 
PLUS THIS BELOW FROM SYDNEY

SYDNEY drivers on Victoria Rd are travelling so slowly that a dragonfly, penguin or polar bear could get to the city quicker.  [A penguin swimming??]
A courier pigeon can travel twice as fast as a courier van negotiating Sydney's busiest roads.
Drivers on Victoria Rd now travel at an average 24km/h - slower than the 26km/h the year before.
And with little money in the coffers for new roads, the future looks bleak for the more than 2 million NSW residents who drive their car every day.
Across Sydney's seven major roads, drivers now experience more congestion and take longer to get to work, and the afternoon peak remains largely unchanged, Auditor-General Peter Achterstraat said.
"Morning peak speeds have worsened on six of the seven major Sydney roads - the morning peak average speed decreased from 31km/h to 29 km/h," Mr Achterstraat said.
Results: Today's poll
Do you think morning peak hour travel speeds have worsened on most Sydney roads?
  • Yes92.06%(2737 votes)
  • No7.94%(236 votes)
 
VICTORIA Road is the most congested major road in Sydney, according to annual travel speed statistics released today.
The average afternoon peak across all roads remained unchanged compared to last year at 42km/h, with Victoria Rd again the slowest at 31km/h.
Yesterday the state government vowed to reduce congestion - not by building the $5 billion M5 duplication or the $10 billion M4 east but by embracing new technology.
These included SCATS (Sydney Co-ordinated Adaptive Traffic System) that ensures traffic lights reflect the demand on an intersection, and PTIPS which alter traffic lights to give buses priority.
"We have committed $200 million to tackle congestion," a spokesman for Roads Minister Duncan Gay said.
Other statistics showed the morning peak speed had fallen on the M4 corridor to 25km/h - compared to 28km/h a year ago - because more traffic was using the road following the removal of the toll in 2010.
The morning and afternoon peak speed fell on the M2/Lane Cove Tunnel/Gore Hill Freeway corridor due to roadwork.
"The first step in increasing productivity is to get people to work," Mr Achterstraat said.
"If you feel like you've had 15 rounds fighting Muhammad Ali before you get to work you're not going to be as productive as someone fresh."
The report examined other facets of Sydney transport, with Mr Achterstraat slamming the Waratah train: "The Waratah project is more than a year behind schedule and continues to experience difficulties."
The report also revealed 19 of 43 major transport projects were late or over budget.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/sydney-nsw/slower-than-a-penguin-sydney-traffic-moves-at-just-24kmh/story-e6freuzi-1226210695796